Why my most popular post about my weight loss journey should not be as popular as it is.

Like the title says, my most popular post by far is one which I believe is only popular because it details extremely rapid weight loss in a mere two week period. And this is concerning to me, because it indicates that people — especially blogs with “fitness,” “weight loss,” “health” etc in their name are co-signing this approach, and it’s absolutely NOT what anyone should be doing unless they are directed to. It was a medically supervised diet which I, like all bariatric patients in Canada, was required to go on for three weeks before my bariatric surgery on October 19, 2021. The purpose is to shrink the liver so that the surgeon has an easier job accessing the stomach without the possibility of nicking the liver.

On top of that, the liquid diet called Optifast is absolutely miserable. Due to the artificial sweeteners in it, your stomach will not thank you. I’m here to be real and say that you will spend a lot of time on the toilet, either unable to have a bowel movement at all, or in my case, constant diarrhea. And I mean constant; it was to the point where if I had to go anywhere, I would fast for six or more hours beforehand so that nothing happened.

And then there were the headaches, the chills and constantly feeling cold (and I’m a hot blooded person who is always warm, and not just due to extra insulation, so to speak), and the changes in mood and sleep. These are all listed as side effects of the box.

This is not the way to lose weight unless it is medically prescribed to you and you are under the close care of a bariatric team, including a dietician!

I am so fortunate to live in Canada where although it does take up to two years in most provinces just to get accepted into bariatric programs to begin the process toward surgery, you are given constant guidance by highly trained professionals who will not approve you for surgery (ergo, you will not even get to the point of the liquid diet until you have been approved medically and psychologically by the program’s doctor, the registered dietician, bariatric nurse, surgeon, and in some cases, a psychiatrist or social worker). This may take anywhere for one visit with each depending on your health and the commitment you have shown to the lifestyle changes, to many visits with the doctor and dietician until they are confident that you are ready. The appointments with the doctor and the dietician are every three months, so it can take a while before you are referred to a surgeon. I was fortunate in that I had already lost weight and was active prior to beginning the program, and I am still young and healthy, and my tests came back negative for sleep apnea, and my ECG, bloodwork, and everything else were almost perfect (I was just below normal in my level of ferritin, which wasn’t completely unexpected as both a vegetarian and a woman of menstruating age).

There is absolutely no easy way out. You have to put the time, effort, energy, and remain dedicated to the process. Weight fell off rapidly during the liquid diet because that’s where the doctor prescribed diet is meant to do in order for medical procedures to go smoothly. Since my operation almost exactly two months ago, I am down nearly 30 pounds. I journal absolutely everything I eat and drink, and make sure I get at least 70 grams of protein a day. I walk a lot, do yoga, and have recently taken up working with a 15 lb kettlebell. And believe it or not, I essentially stalled for three weeks, with that only coming to an end this past week.

I will have follow ups with the wonderful staff at the program for many months and years to come. I’ve won the lottery, I truly feel like.

So, in conclusion to this post: don’t do the liquid diet. Stop liking the post just because it has rapid weight loss and rapid loss of inches over a short period of time. It was medically ordered.

If you want to lose weight in a healthful way but aren’t looking to have bariatric surgery, I recommend Weight Watchers/WW. Full disclosure: Keto is not much of an option for me as a vegetarian, so this is not meant ti malign that way of eating and the lifestyle: I had tremendous success with WW several times, losing 100 lbs when I was a teenager and about 75 lbs a few years after. Just because I gained the weight back does not mean that WW does not work or is not sustainable for life. Like anything, you have to be extremely diligent, but there is also a lot or genetics and emotional issues at play. The regain cycle and the body’s set point is something I will get into in another post today.

Weight loss is so much more than just losing weight.

This is very personal, but I don’t mind sharing if it helps or inspires someone out there reading this, just as reading blogs, forums, and watching vlogs of those facing similar struggles did before I embarked on my weight loss and mental wellness journey. It’s not pretty, and it’s going to be out there on the internet forever. And that’s okay with me. Because this is reality; the reality that so often isn’t shared in favour of having picture-picture white smiles and exotic locations for likes on social media. Nary a mention of depression and eating disorders is made, because the truth isn’t pretty. But you know what? Life isn’t pretty, but if you fight for health and wellness, you’ll be rewarded with a life that’s happier than you could have possibly imagined prior to dedicating the time and effort to yourself to get well, get healthy, and get back to living!

My mission is to be real. To show you the ups and downs of this all. I’m just a regular person trying my best in this journey called life. And if it helps inspire, then that’s my honour and privilege.

This is what depression versus wellness and health looks like. I felt very alone here in the scruffy pictures and was isolated, and of course piled on more weight during quarantine. I felt kind of like I didn’t belong on this island and took it harder than I should have. I’m someone who has always cared about looking presentable regardless of my size, but I stopped caring. I didn’t even brush my hair most days and hardly went out because I was ashamed of how I looked and how much weight I’d gained. The funny thing is, I was already a month into my weight loss journey when I took those two horrendous pictures. The other one was on my birthday. I still have a ways to go, but I’m miles from where I was. So please, if you’re having issues with depression and/or your weight, know that you’re not alone and there’s help out there. It’s not corny to say that at all. I’m not sharing this for asspats, but rather because seeing my former reality may mirror your present situation. And I want you to know that the nightmare can and WILL end.

December 7, 2021 – (My birthday!) – versus January 21, 2021 – One month into my weight loss journey; 10 months before my VSG. Total weight difference between the two is about 70 lbs.

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Two weeks on the liquid diet! One week to left on it, because surgery is next week!

Firstly, Happy Thanksgiving to those of you who celebrated yesterday or are waiting until today to celebrate. I celebrated by adding some nutmeg and cinnamon to my chocolate Optifast shake to give it a taste reminiscent of pumpkin pie (urgh, my favourite). It didn’t taste like it, obviously, but it’s quite a nice addition.

Secondly, there are so many things I’m thankful for this Thanksgiving, but I will just say this: I am so grateful for this opportunity to have weight loss surgery and to work with the fabulous health care team that I’m working with, and all of those who have supported me thus far, and will support me afterward in my recovery and beyond.

So. It’s been two weeks today since I started my liquid diet. I’d love to say it’s been easy, but it hasn’t. Also, I weighed myself this morning and was up 2 pounds, which leaves me at a loss of 11.5 lbs as opposed to the 13.5 lbs I had lost the last time I weighed myself. I know, I know, I shouldn’t focus on the scale as much because there are so many variables which play into it, but it is a bit of a letdown when all I consumed yesterday was 650 calories. I got all four of my Optifast shakes in, as opposed to just the three I’d been struggling with for most of these two weeks, but didn’t have any of the veggie broth yesterday. Maybe that had something to do with it, or maybe the fact that I didn’t get enough water did. I don’t know, but still, 11.5 lbs is still something to be very proud of.

For those wondering: this diet is meant to shrink the liver so that the surgeon has better access to the stomach through laparoscopic surgery. Canada is one of the strictest countries in the world it seems as far as length of liquid pre-surgery diet is concerned, as well as what we are allowed to consume: only four Optifast and a cup of broth a day. Better safe than sorry, I guess.

Another thing that probably has contributed to my weight loss slowing down is the fact that I just can’t really leave home, because I feel awful most of the time and have a lot of gastrointestinal issues that I won’t get into, for your sake and mine.

But not all is bad. Hell, nothing is bad (except how I feel physically, but that’s to be expected). As of this morning, even though I was up two pounds, I lost even more inches! I’ve lost 11.5 inches off of my waist, 4 inches off of my thighs, 3 off of my biceps, and 3 off of my calves. So I will count that as a victory indeed.

One week today I’ll be make the two and a half hour journey to the hospital to get my surgery (the next day).

I have a killer headache and not much energy, so I’ll end it here. I hope you’re having a fabulous day.

This is not easy. Getting ready for WLS/Bariatric Surgery/VSG

Well, I can finally say that I’m getting my surgery done THIS MONTH now that it’s October 1.

Today (October 1, 2021) and the last few days since I updated have not been easy. There’s been a lot of gastrointestinal maladies that I won’t go into details about, but I do feel need to be mentioned to just prepare anyone embarking on this three week Optifast journey in preparation for the bariatric surgery. Not everyone has these issues; some deal with constipation, whilst others have no problems but just dislike the taste – some even like the taste!

I have quite a sensitive stomach to the artificial sweeteners, so it’s been a lot more difficult for me. But I feel like today I rounded the corner in the sense that I was awake all day, able to get some things done, and I didn’t have the constant thoughts of food that I was having for the first few days.

I also go a phone call from the pre-admin clinic and I have quite a few appointments coming up next week with the hospital’s pharmacist, anesthetist, as well as getting a requisition to my local hospital for a chest x-ray, as well as more bloodwork and an ECG on Monday morning. I’m not sure when the chest x-ray will occur, but hopefully soon! My surgery date in on the 19th!

Also, I haven’t weighed myself since the start of Optifast due to scale difficulties that have now been rectified, but I have lost six inches of my waist since Monday – insanity! It’s worth noting that I did have a large cheese and pineapple pizza on Sunday night as my “goodbye meal,” so I was probably just very bloated when I took my measurements on Monday. Still, it’s not too shabby!

I know I said I’d have some pictures and video up, but I’ve honestly not felt well enough. I’ve been in my pyjamas and in bed with the occasional walk for the better part of this week. I don’t know why it’s hit me so hard, but hey, everyone’s journey is different.

I feel a bit fed up, I feel upset, defeated at times, and I cry. But I’m keeping my eye on the prize. And fortunately I have a great support group on Zoom of ladies going through the same thing. Thank you to them immensely and to the social worker who facilitates it.

But most of all, thank you for reading and putting up with my whininess!

Sept 28 recap: Liquid diet day 2 out of 21 in preparation for weight loss surgery (WLS / VSG)

I’m not going to lie and say this is easy. In fact, it’s downright miserable. According to others in the bariatric program I belong to, the surgery where you get 85% of your stomach cut out is the easy part: the hardest is the three week liquid diet! Yesterday was the hardest day so far, because I keep forgetting that I can’t eat anything other than the Optifast or a cup of veggie broth. I’ve not strayed, but the temptation is there. I will not waver, however. I still haven’t taken my “before” pictures nor have I weighed myself as unfortunate the scale is presently out of batteries and I didn’t feel well enough to leave the house yesterday to get new ones. Yes, you feel that badly on Optifast for the first few days.

There is definitely a part of me that mourns the loss of food in the way I’ve always used it (yes, used, as well as consumed – I am addicted to food) and will always. I know that once I get my vertical sleeve gastrectomy that I’ll be able to have tiny portions of treat meals a few times a year after about 18 months post-op. But it’s a slippery slope for me, as I’ve lost significant amounts of weight in the past and have treated myself to “cheat” meals that became cheat weeks, and eventually turned into cheat years. Whilst I’m not as overweight as some of the people who get surgery, I wouldn’t have been approved for this surgery if I didn’t need it. I felt out of control with my eating for so long and I tried absolutely everything, and yes, of course sensible eating and lots of exercise. I always tended to shy away from fad diets like the cabbage soup diet or whatever restrictive diet of the day was, and I’d stick with programs like Weight Watchers, which is tried and true and healthy and balanced. I lost so much weight two or three times on WW over the years, but keeping it off longer than a few years was all but impossible for me. I always felt so ashamed when I’d gain the weight back, as though it was some sort of personal failing and an outward manifestation of some sort of character flaw and weakness.

There’s so much more to obesity than that. It’s so much more than people being lazy, gorging on fast food constantly, and drinking pop non-stop. For me, I ate quite healthy, just too much, and I was a grazer. Always looking for something to munch on, and on a 5’2.5 – 5’3 ft frame, that adds up quickly.

So. We’ll see what today brings. I have a group therapy class about changing eating habits and thoughts/emotions about food this morning on Zoom for an hour and a half — this will be the third week now, and it’s 4 weeks long, which means it will end just before my surgery on October 19. I plan to carry on with counselling after my surgery just to insure long term success. After all, this didn’t happen overnight, and it won’t be fixed by a surgery either — I’ll just be given a wonderful tool and what I do with that tool is up to me. And you can bet your ass I’m not going to fail after waiting two years on a weight list, and a further 5 months from orientation to surgery, with a zillion appointments with doctors, dieticians, social workers, phlebotomists, internal medicine doctors, surgeons, bariatric nurses etc etc etc etc.

I’m in this to win it. And I’m in not in competition with anyone but myself, and goddamn it, I’m proud of the woman I’m becoming, and I know that I’ll be shedding weight, but gaining so much more.

Life is about to begin. I’ve been given this opportunity and I will not do anything to screw it up.

Oh, and to those who think this is the easy way out? Kiss my luscious ass. I’d love to see you do this, and then eat tiny portions of mush for a further six months, with protein powder mixed in to absolutely everything you eat, and for the rest of your life only being able to sip water very slowly in small amounts or end up in extreme pain. No straws, no carbonated drinks, keeping track of not just carbs, calories, fat, but making sure you get in enough liquid and at least 90 grams of protein, and timing yourself at every meal so that you take at least 30 minutes with no distractions like your phone, a book, or even much conversation. Just pure mindfulness. Not to mention the pain, the hardship, and the judgment from others. Actually, I don’t care about people judging me — I think it’s worth it to share my story so that it may inspire others who are thinking of having weight loss surgery (don’t do the lapbands though – they are outdated, 90%+ get removed, and they cause health issues, and each removal costs between $3,000 and $14,000, meaning taxpayers are on the hook for up to $33 million).

I’ll have up some pictures and perhaps videos later on today or tomorrow.